Personal Injury Claims and Rental Venues

Personal Injury Lawyer

There are many events that require using space at a rental event hall in Glendale, CA where the organizers of the event do not have any ownership of the building. If someone were to get hurt while at an event, there are many questions about who is responsible for the injuries that a guest or someone working the event may sustain. There are a few facts that can help you understand laws pertaining to any personal injuries that could occur in a rental location.

Commercial Liability

In most situations, if someone becomes injured in a commercial location, they can go to the company that uses the facility in order to receive some compensation for their injuries. In most states, businesses have an obligation to ensure their visitors are safe. If an injury takes place because of an unsafe practice at the business, then that business is responsible for any injuries or damages that take place. Falls, slips, and injuries from something falling on them are the most common types of injuries that lead to personal injury claims in rental venues.

Rental Venues are Businesses

The owner of the rental venue’s business is to provide a space for someone to hold an event, therefore, rental venues are commonly seen as a business establishment. It does not matter if the venue is a large banquet hall, restaurant room, or a space outside, the person who is renting the space out is in the renting business, just the same as a landlord is in the renting business of apartments or stores in a mall. In terms of rental venues, the responsibility may not be only limited to the building’s owner.

Safety of Guest

It is the building owner’s responsibility, especially if the building is being rented for events, to ensure they are providing a venue that is safe for anyone who would attend the event. If tables are not stacked properly, handrails are missing, or a large obstruction that is blocking a well-traveled path, the owner has lived up to their responsibility of providing a safe environment. Because of this, they could be held responsible for any injury that a guest could have. However, the person who is renting the venue is also responsible to make sure their guests are safe. For example, if someone who is working at the event spills water and a guest falls because of it, the renter would more likely be held responsible instead of the building owner.

Licensee vs. Invitee

In many states there are two different types of responsibility if someone becomes hurt in a commercial venue. A licensee is someone who is able to be on the venue grounds but is not a customer. The true customer of a rental space is the person who is renting the space, however, those who are invited to attend the event at the venue are part of the venue’s business. An invitee is the renter and anyone who is invited to attend an event at the venue. There is a great responsibility for injuries if an invitee sustains an injury versus if a licensee sustains an injury.

 


 

Thanks to Metropol for their insight into rental venues and personal injury claims.

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